Charles Loring Elliott (1812-1868)

Charles Loring Elliott, Self-Portrait, c 1845 Pennslyvania Academy of Fine Arts, 1933.10.17.l

Charles Loring Elliott, Self-Portrait, c 1845
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, 1933.10.17.l

Charles Loring Elliott “was as widely loved and admired for his geniality and kindness as he was respected for his artistic excellence. He also was well known for his fondness of drink.”[1] In 1846, Elliott’s friend Henry Inman (1801-1846), New York City’s most popular portrait artist, predicted his successor would be Elliott. Elliott did indeed become the artistic capitol’s favorite portraitist. He preserved likenesses of the artistic, literary, and political giants of the time, including Mathew B. Brady, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and John C. Fremont.

The excellence of his technique shines through in his ability to paint a realistic hand or ear. His artistic ability bursts through in the faces of his best portraits. Elliott became a stereotype of temperamental artist in 1860 when he drunkenly stormed into an exhibition at the National Academy and tried to cut one of his paintings down from the wall. He disliked its position in the show.

Charles Loring Elliott, Gentleman, c 1849 Private Collection (Detail)

Charles Loring Elliott, Gentleman, c 1849
Private Collection (Detail)

Charles Loring Elliott, Mathew B. Brady, 1857 Metropolitan Museum of Art, 96.24

Charles Loring Elliott, Mathew B. Brady,1857
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 96.24

Charles Loring Elliott, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Brooklyn Museum 26.521

Charles Loring Elliott, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, 1842-1846
Brooklyn Museum 26.521

Charles Loring Elliott, Self-Portrait, c 1845 Pennslyvania Academy of Fine Arts, 1933.10.17.l

Charles Loring Elliott, Self-Portrait, c 1845, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, 1933.10.17.l

"Charles

Charles Loring Elliott, Self-Portrait, Walters Art Museum 37.68

Charles Loring Elliott, Self-Portrait,
Walters Art Museum 37.68

For more biographical information:

at National Gallery of Art and  National Academy Museum

[1] “Charles Loring Elliott (1812-1868),” Artists and Architects, National Academy Museum, http://www.nationalacademy.org/collections/artists/detail/291/#/grid/525

(c) Fine Art Investigations, 2014
All Rights Reserved

About Patricia Moss

Patricia Moss is an art historian, or art detective if you will, who solves mysteries of 19th century American portraits. She located nearly 70 of Bingham’s lost portraits, a feat acknowledged by the Smithsonian’s Research and Scholar’s Center. From expertise with portraits of George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879), she developed skills that evolved into a comprehensive system based on the scientific method that conforms to the legal and ethical standards of art authentication. Moss served as a guest curator for the Bingham Bicentennial Exhibit, “Steamboats to Steam Engines: George Caleb Bingham’s Missouri: 1819-1879,” (March 10-September 8, 2011) at the Truman Presidential Museum and curated the opening exhibition, “George Caleb Bingham: Witness to History,” (September 2013 –), Jackson County Art Museum, Independence, Missouri. She is also the principal researcher for Fine Art Investigations.
This entry was posted in 19th Century American Portrait Artists and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.