Jeremiah Pearson Hardy

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy (1800-1887), an American artist not well-known outside Maine, created this simple yet striking portrait of his sister Mary Ann in 1821 when she was 12 and he was 21.  He soon would leave for Boston, and later New York, to study under David Brown (1794-) and Samuel F. B. Morse (1791-1872).

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Mary Ann Hardy, 1821, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts,  47.1135

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Mary Ann Hardy, 1821
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, 47.1135

At the end of his training, Jeremiah Hardy married Catharine Sears Wheeler (1806-1876). The following year, he painted a distinguished portrait of Abraham Hanson.

 Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Abraham Hanson, c 1828, Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts 1943.14

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Abraham Hanson, c 1828
Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts 1943.14

In his chosen home of Bangor, Maine, he was a popular portrait artist.

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Frances A. Blake, ND Bowdoin College Museum of Art, 1901.1.D

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Frances A. Blake, ND
Bowdoin College Museum of Art, 1901.1.D

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Reverend Cyrus Hamlin, ND, Private Collection

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Reverend Cyrus Hamlin, ND
Private Collection

But his best work, as with most artists, came when he portrayed his close-knit, creative family.  Jeremiah’s sister, Mary Ann Hardy, was an artist/ miniaturist.  Jeremiah’s three children were photographer Francis Willard Hardy (1830 – 1908), naturalist Manly Hardy (1832 – 1910) and floral artist Anna Eliza Hardy (1839 – 1934).  Hardy painted his son Manly in the 1830s.

eremiah Pearson Hardy, Manly Hardy, ND, Private Collection

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Manly Hardy, ND
Private Collection

The stunning and best known of his works is his double portrait of his wife Catharine and their daughter Anna Eliza, painted around 1848.

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Catharine Wheeler Hardy and Her Daughter, c 1848 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 47.1146

Jeremiah Pearson Hardy, Catharine Wheeler Hardy and Her Daughter, c 1848
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 47.1146

So many artists. So little time.

 

(c) Fine Art Investigations, 2014
All Rights Reserved

About Patricia Moss

Patricia Moss is an art historian, or art detective if you will, who solves mysteries of 19th century American portraits. She located nearly 70 of Bingham’s lost portraits, a feat acknowledged by the Smithsonian’s Research and Scholar’s Center. From expertise with portraits of George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879), she developed skills that evolved into a comprehensive system based on the scientific method that conforms to the legal and ethical standards of art authentication. Moss served as a guest curator for the Bingham Bicentennial Exhibit, “Steamboats to Steam Engines: George Caleb Bingham’s Missouri: 1819-1879,” (March 10-September 8, 2011) at the Truman Presidential Museum and curated the opening exhibition, “George Caleb Bingham: Witness to History,” (September 2013 –), Jackson County Art Museum, Independence, Missouri. She is also the principal researcher for Fine Art Investigations.
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